Mars Global Surveyor
Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC)


Images Acquired Through MGS MOC Public Target Request Program, 2003–2006

These are Non-Validated (pre-Archival) Data

These data are in the public domain


The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) Public Target Request Site began collecting public and science community suggestions for MOC narrow angle imaging on 20 August 2003. With the loss of the MGS spacecraft on 2 November 2006, the program came to an end.

Targets suggested by the public were incorporated into the MGS MOC operational database at Malin Space Science Systems. There, they waited until a time when MGS was predicted to pass over the requested site. When the predicted ground track intersected a site of interest, the MOC operations team determined the best way to acquire the requested image, then commanded the camera to do so. Several days later, the image was acquired and returned to Earth.

Links to publicly suggested images were posted to this web site once a month, in chronological order, the most recent month at the top. Images and ancillary data presented on this page were not validated or archived at the time of their posting to this site, and should be considered previews. Within 6 to 12 months of acquisition, all data were validated and archived in final form with the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) and posted in the MOC Gallery. Typically, the labor-intensive data validation process resulted in improvements and corrections to the image headers and the table (.tab) of ancillary information. For MOC images that have data drops in them, the validation process may also have resulted in improved recovery of the dropped data. Until the images are validated and archived, the data posted on this page were the best available.

All data posted to this page are in the public domain. The processed images posted here are value added products; their use in all forms of publication should be credited to NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems. Click on the Month Data Were Acquired to see the Public Images obtained during that month.

Month Data Were Acquired
Mission Subphase
Total NA images*
Date Data Posted Here
October 2006
S23
11
13 November 2006
September 2006
S22
14
4 October 2006
August 2006
S21
24
7 September 2006
July 2006
S20
33
11 August 2006
June 2006
S19
26
14 July 2006
May 2006
S18
41
12 June 2006
April 2006
S17
39
15 May 2006
March 2006
S16
42
11 April 2006
February 2006
S15
67
15 March 2006
January 2006
S14
72
10 February 2006
December 2005
S13
31
9 January 2006
November 2005
S12
67
16 December 2005
October 2005
S11
67
9 November 2005
September 2005
S10
32
21 October 2005
August 2005
S09
53
19 September 2005
July 2005
S08
61
26 August 2005
June 2005
S07
56
29 July 2005
May 2005
S06
57
22 June 2005
April 2005
S05
45
25 May 2005
March 2005
S04
39
22 April 2005
February 2005
S03
30
25 March 2005
January 2005
S02
21
28 February 2005
December 2004
S01
16
14 January 2005
November 2004
R23
8
14 December 2004
October 2004
R22
16
12 November 2004
September 2004
R21
4
19 October 2004
August 2004
R20
12
13 September 2004
July 2004
R19
17
25 August 2004
June 2004
R18
22
21 July 2004
May 2004
R17
18
22 June 2004
April 2004
R16
10
17 May 2004
March 2004
R15
12
20 April 2004
February 2004
R14
10
25 March 2004
January 2004
R13
22
17 February 2004
December 2003
R12
15
21 January 2004
November 2003
R11
16
15 December 2003
October 2003
R10
10
28 November 2003
September 2003
R09
5
12 Sept. & 17 Oct. 2003

* The number of images per month is largely a function of the amount of data that can be downlinked, which varies as a function of Earth-Mars distance. When Mars is closer to Earth (near opposition), more data can be received. When Mars is farther from Earth (near conjunction), less data can be received. When Mars and Earth are in conjunction, meaning that Mars is on the other side of the Sun relative to Earth, no data can be received for a period of usually ~1 week, and images obtained within a month of that time are often full of data drops. The number of images per month, secondarily, are a function of ground track walk. If the same ground track repeats every month or two, then all the public images requested along that track have been acquired during the earlier month (this is why December 2005 had so many fewer public images than the month before and after).



© 2007 by Malin Space Science Systems, Inc.